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News and Events

New Housing Trust Seeks Members
Updated

If you are interested in affordable housing and have some relevant background as described, the Town needs you to volunteer! See more information here.

 

Updated

The Warrant is open for the submission of Articles for the Southampton Special Town Meeting on December 5th at 7:00 PM at Norris Elementary School,

The subission of Artices for this Special Town Meeting is open until Monday, November 6th at 4:00 PM.  Articles should be submitted to the Town Administrators' Office in Town Hall by that date and time.

Updated

On October 23, 2023 @ 7PM, Town residents will have an opportunity to comment on a proposed draft of the Town's Unregistered Vehicles Bylaw. Please go to the Bylaw Review Advisory Review Committee page to see the full text.

The meeting will be held in the Select Board room.  For persons unable to attend the Public Meeting, the Committee will accept comments via email (bylawreview@townofsouthampton.org); all comments received by October 20, 2023 will be read at the Public Meeting.  

FLU CLINIC OCT. 10th
  • Board of Health
Updated

A Flu clinic is being offered at Norris School on October 10 from 11a-1p. Sign up here!

Updated

Southampton Virtual Public Forum to Gain Residents Input on Next Town Administrator

Virtual Community Forum Sept. 27: The Southampton Select Board invites residents to share their thoughts on the skills and experience needed in Southampton's next Town Administrator.

The Town has hired the consulting firm Community Paradigm Associates to assist in the search process. Bernard Lynch, Principal of the firm, will facilitate the virtual forum.

Join the discussion Sept. 27th, 7:00 p.m.  

Zoom Meeting ID: 842 6504 8005   Passcode: 574095

Zoom Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84265048005?pwd=SDdRK2hwS1ZuOGt1TDE5dVUwWmliQT09

Updated

The work on the new Cemetery irrigation will begin on Monday, June 19th.  As of Tuesday, June 20th the current water system will be shut off.  The work to complete the new water system will be completed and the water will be turned back on again by the end of this Month.

I would like to thank the Water department and water commissioners for donating the required backflow preventer for this system.  By doing that it saved us about $1,000 and brought the project back to being in budget and allowed us to move forward.

Ed

Edward J. Gibson

Town Administrator/Chief Financial Officer

 

Updated

WATER, ROADS AND PUBLIC SAFETY

Come to a Southampton Community Conversation!

Please join Town officials and community members for a May 24th facilitated discussion related to residents’ expectations for firefighting/water service availability and current Southampton capacities. Together, we’ll learn about our rural infrastructure and its strengths and challenges, and work to identify possible approaches to addressing gaps and issues.

Wednesday, May 24th at 6:30 pm at the William E. Norris School; this conversation will be recorded by Easthampton Media for post-meeting viewing.

 

View recorded meeting

  • Select Board
Updated

The Bylaw Review Committee is hosting a demonstration and information session of the Town’s new, web-based bylaw system on Monday, April 10th at 7 PM in the first floor conference room. The demonstration will be conducted by a representative of General Code, the company selected to codify and reorganize Southampton’s General and Zoning Bylaws. The new system significantly improves access and utilization of one of the Town’s most important information sources. A draft of the warrant article summarizing the General Bylaw edits resulting from the reorganization will also be shared at this meeting. We hope you can join us.

  • Board of Assessors
Updated

Notice

The Board of Assessors has hired a consultant to inspect properties beginning the weekend of March 25, 2023. The Department of Revenue requires that communities re-inspect all property at least every nine years. It is a critical element in maintaining the most current property database, and helps ensure that all taxpayers are assessed fairly, and pay their fair share of the property tax burden.

Home Modification Loan Program (HMLP)

The Home Modification Loan Program provides no-interest loans to modify the homes of adults and children with disabilities. If you or a household member is disabled or an elder, the Home Modification Loan Program can provide a loan so you can make needed adaptations or modifications to your home. Modifications can help you remain in your home and live more independently. Information can be found at Mass.gov.


How to Rent Conant Park

 


New Library Events



Citizen Emergency Management Assistance Program (CEMAP)

Please contact Sergeant Illingsworth at 413-527-1120 or email him if you would like to establish the program in your neighborhood.


More Links of Interest

Weather and Safety Alerts

Roof Collapse & Storm Drain Safety Information here


MEMA Information About the Threat of Roof Collapse

Additional Snow Buildup Can Present Dangers

FRAMINGHAM, MA (Jan 30, 2015) – “With the threat of approaching storms, additional snow can add weight and stress to the roofs of structures if not cleared. Also, for areas that get rain, the dry, fluffy snow piled on roofs can act as a sponge, absorbing any additional sleet and rain,” says Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) Director Kurt Schwartz. “Flat, commercial roofs are most susceptible if they are not draining properly.”

To minimize the risk of over-stressing a building roof due to accumulated or drifting snow:

• Be on the alert for large accumulating snow build-up or snowdrifts on your roofs.
• If roof snow can be removed, from the ground, with the use of a snow rake (available at most hardware stores), do so. Use caution, as metal snow rakes conduct electricity if they come into contact with a power line.
• Try to avoid working from ladders, as ladder rungs tend to ice up. Snow and ice collect on boot soles, and metal ladders.
• Flat roofs can be shoveled clear, but only if it is determined that the roof is safe to stand upon. Exercise care when on the roof to avoid potentially dangerous falls.
• Flat roof drainage systems should be kept clear to minimize the risk of excess roof ponding in the event of subsequent heavy rainfall or melting.
• Large icicles can form on roof overhangs, but do not necessarily mean ice damming is occurring. Icicles overhanging doorways and walkways can be dangerous and should be carefully removed.
• All of the mentioned actions should only be performed by able-bodied adults, as the snow is heavy, and roofs and other surfaces may be slippery. Protective headgear and eye protection is recommended.
• In many cases, roof ice dams can form causing water build-up, leading to interior damage. To minimize the risk of over-stressing a building roof due to accumulated or drifting snow.
• Be on the alert for large accumulating snow build-up or snowdrifts on your roofs.
• If roof snow can be removed, from the ground, with the use of a snow rake (available at most hardware stores), do so. Use caution, as metal snow rakes conduct electricity if they come into contact with a power line.
• Try to avoid working from ladders, as ladder rungs tend to ice up. Snow and ice collect on boot soles, and metal ladders.
• Flat roofs can be shoveled clear, but only if it is determined that the roof is safe to stand upon. Exercise care when on the roof to avoid potentially dangerous falls.
• Flat roof drainage systems should be kept clear to minimize the risk of excess roof ponding in the event of subsequent heavy rainfall or melting.
• Large icicles can form on roof overhangs, but do not necessarily mean ice damming is occurring. Icicles overhanging doorways and walkways can be dangerous and should be carefully removed.
• All of the suggested actions should only be performed by able-bodied adults, as the snow is heavy, and roofs and other surfaces may be slippery. Protective headgear and eye protection is recommended.

MEMA is the state agency charged with ensuring the state is prepared to withstand, respond to, and recover from all types of emergencies and disasters, including natural hazards, accidents, deliberate attacks, and technological and infrastructure failures. MEMA is committed to an all hazards approach to emergency management. By building and sustaining effective partnerships with federal, state and local government agencies, and with the private sector – – individuals, families, non-profits, and businesses – – MEMA ensures the Commonwealth’s ability to rapidly recover from large and small disasters by assessing and mitigating threats and hazards, enhancing preparedness, coordinating response operations, and strengthening our capacity to rebuild and recover.

For additional information about MEMA, go to www.mass.gov/mema. Also, follow MEMA on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MassEMA; Facebook at www.facebook.com/MassachusettsEMA; and YouTube at www.youtube.com/MassachusettsEMA. Massachusetts Alerts: to receive emergency information on your smartphone, including severe weather alerts from the National Weather Service and emergency information from MEMA, download the Massachusetts Alerts free app. To learn more about Massachusetts Alerts, and for additional information on how to download the free app onto your smartphone, visit: www.mass.gov/mema/mobileapp.


Weather: MEMA Issues Ice Safety Precautions

FRAMINGHAM, MA – In spite of the recent cold spell, the ice conditions of many bodies of water across the Commonwealth remain uncertain, as demonstrated by the recent ice rescues of a number of individuals and pets. Therefore, the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) has issued information regarding safety precautions to be taken on our frozen lakes, rivers and ponds.

“Before we experience a tragedy that is unfortunately too common this time of year, it is important that we remind everyone, particularly children, of the dangers of unsafe ice,” said MEMA Director Kurt Schwartz. “People may be a bit impatient and venture out on the ice for skating, hockey, ice fishing and other winter sports before understanding the conditions. We highly recommend the use of recreational skating areas provided by the Commonwealth and your local communities. It is very important to exercise precaution and common sense.”

Always check with your local police, fire or park department to ensure that safe ice conditions exist. However, due to the uncertainty and constant changing of ice conditions and the dangers presented, many departments will not endorse the safety of lakes, ponds, streams or rivers. The strength and thickness of ice should be known before any activity takes place.• Never go onto the ice alone. A friend may be able to rescue you or go for help if you fall through the ice.

• Always keep your pets on a leash. If a pet falls through the ice do not attempt to rescue your pet, call 9-1-1 or go for help.
• New ice is usually stronger than old ice. As ice ages, the bond between the crystals decays, making it weaker, even if melting has not occurred.
• Beware of ice covered with snow. Snow can insulate ice and keep it strong, but can also insulate it to keep it from freezing. Snow can also hide cracks, weak and open ice.
• Slush is a danger sign, indicating that ice is no longer freezing from the bottom and can be weak or deteriorating.
• Ice formed over flowing water (rivers and lakes containing a large number of springs) is generally 15% weaker.
• Ice seldom freezes or thaws at a uniform rate. It can be one foot thick in one spot and be only a few inches thick 10 feet away.
• Reach-Throw-Go. If a companion falls through the ice and you are unable to reach that person from shore, throw them something (a rope, jumper cables, tree branch, etc.). If this does not work, go for help or call 9-1-1, before you also become a victim. Get medical assistance for the victim immediately.
• If you fall in, try not to panic. Turn toward the direction from which you came. Place your hands and arms on the unbroken surface, working forward by kicking your feet. Once out, remain lying on the ice (do not stand) and roll away from the hole. Crawl back to your tracks, keeping your weight distributed until you return to solid ice.

For more information, visit the MA Department of Fire Services’ Ice and Cold Water Safety webpage.

By following safety procedures, you can be safe and enjoy the many winter activities offered by the great outdoors.